Eyah

Yahweh loves you and Y’shu loves you!

yee-hou-ah and e-shu

Meshikhi Hebrew משיחי Aramaic ܡܫܝܼܚܵܝܵܐ
transliterated: mshch
translated: adj. Christian, Messianic
meaning: “of the Messiah” or “A Follower of the Messiah”
How to say it:

Jehovah , Yahweh , Yah , the Supreme Being , the Eternal , God , YHWH

Aramaic ܝܲܗ pronunciation ‘ iah

Eyah

The voice of God simply replied `Eyah asher Eyah’`I am (the one) who is called Eyah’ – the name of Ea in its West Semitic (Hebrew) form.

Some Scholars have simply failed to recognize (most often those with strong theological ties) that this is another of those characteristic puns in which the Old Testament abounds. `I am (Eyah) he who is called (asher) Ea (Eyah)’ is a classic biblical play on words.

It also explains God’s apparently nonsensical instruction:
`This is what you are to say to the Israelites, I am has sent me to you”.

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that the above statement makes no sense. The words properly translated are `Eyah has sent me to you’.

Note: Hebrew ייִאה Latin Iiah

People don’t know how to take Elohim.  He was totally having fun with his friend Moses.  He is just that type of person.

If you pray to Elohim using the name Eyah he will crack up.

The One

Here’s what I believe.  Prior to Exodus 3:15, he was simply The One to most people.  They were aware of him and worshipped him as a deity.  When they were clean moral people he would bless them.

Abraham, Isaac and Jacob called him God Almighty, El Shaddai.

Yahweh

But as for his name Yahweh, he had not made himself known.  Whoa, back up.

He didn’t say that, he said as for my name יחוח I did not make my name known to them.

It is important to note that his name is transliterated YHWH/YHUH and means He Who Causes To Be.

So we have the Tetragrammaton and He Who Causes To Be.  That’s his actual name he gave himself.

So, he was known as Eyah (The One), but was about to reveal his name, Yahweh.

Here’s where it gets tricky.  It’s there and we are supposed to use it.  It’s in the Bible around 7000 times.

So what gives?

Our Father

The answer is at Matthew 6:9

“You must pray, then, this way: “‘Our Father in the heavens, let your name be sanctified.

So, you might know your Father’s name is Bob and you might tell others his name is Bob but when you are talking to him would you call him Bob?  Most people don’t have that type of relationship with their Father.

He doesn’t want us calling up and saying, “Hi Bob”.

He wants us to address him as “Our Father”, and note, not just “My Father”, but to remember he is everyone’s Father, we don’t have exclusive ownership of him.

So that’s it.  His name is Yahweh, we can tell people his name is Yahweh and that the four letters YHWH means He Causes To Become.  But tell them when they pray to follow Jesus instructions and say, “Our Father in the heavens, I approach you in the name of Y’shu (pronounced Eshu).

Then as you are speaking it is natural to call him “Father”.

He is wonderful, love him always and hold him dear.  He is truly Our Father.

I am reintroducing the human family to Yahweh, the only true Elohim. There should be no other elohim and no other name of Elohim under Heaven. He is Almighty but lowly. He will listen when you talk to him. He is a person like us, but perfect, with unlimited power and ability.

Yahweh is warm, funny, loving, and wonderful to know. His dream is to fill the Earth with happy healthy people. And it will happen, Yeshua shares his vision for people. He believes in it so much he was willing to die to make it happen.

Elohim’s Name

Vocalization of the Hebrew Tetragrammaton YHWH has been discovered.  It is pronounced Yahweh and means “He Who Causes To Be”.

YHWH

The “a” vowel in the first syllable is quite secure. We know this because an abbreviated form of the divine name (“Yah” – always vocalized with “a”) appears in the Hebrew Bible nearly 50 times, mostly in Psalms (e.g., Exod 15:2; Exod 17:16 – note, this is the same book as the longer form; Isa 12:2; Isa 26:4 – along with the longer form; Psa 68:5; Psa 68:19). The most familiar form to readers is no doubt the phrase halelû-Yah (“praise Yah!”; e.g., Psa 146:10; Psa 147: 1).

The real controversial part of all this for scholars comes with the second syllable (scholars lead exciting lives). Here’s what must be accounted for:

1. The form itself must be the imperfect conjugation, since the “y” of the first syllable is prefixed to the verb root (hyh/hwh).

2. The first syllable must have an a-class vowel (“yah”) to account for the abbreviated form of the name noted above.

3. The second syllable must be an i-class vowel because of the verb root (lemma). The ancient Semitic root hwy also requires an i-class vowel in the second syllable.

There is only one morphological verb formation (parsing) that makes sense of these elements: Hiphil stem, third person, singular, imperfect conjugation, from hyh/hwh. This form is vocalized yahyeh / yahweh and would mean “he who causes to be” (the Hiphil is a causative stem in Hebrew). This is controversial because the verb hyh/hwh does not appear in the Hiphil causative stem elsewhere. Hence scholars are uneasy about taking the divine name this way. Personally, the logic here doesn’t feel compelling to me. I;m not sure why it’s necessary to have a verb form appear elsewhere for it to be considered coherent where it does / might occur. I understand the desire for another example, but it is not a logical necessity if it makes sense. And in the context of Israel’s God in effect creating a nation out of the slave population of Israel, it makes good theological / conceptual sense. But I’m in the minority here, probably because of the (in my view, overly cautious and logically unnecessary) desire for an external example of this lemma in this stem.

What went wrong

Translating God's Name - What went wrong

Note: This is how we ended up with Yehowah and it’s English translation Jehovah.

Some people confuse יְהוֹ‬ (Yeho) with יְהֹ (God). This is how Yehowah יְהֹוָה and Yehoshua יְהֹשֻׁעַ came about.

I enlarged it so you could get a good look at it.

Jahveh – The true English translation of Yahweh

The English translation of Elohim’s name is spelled Jahveh (not Jehovah) and pronounced “Yahweh”.

Google edit submitted.

Pronunciation Note:  The ancient Hebrew letter vav is  “always” a “w” sound, however, the way I speak, it is normal for my bottom lip to tap my top teeth and it will sound more like a soft “v” as in the Latin Jahveh(Yah-veh).

The short form is spelled “Jah” and pronounced “Yah”.

Honor William Tyndale

Tyndale wrote about the divine name: “IEHOUAH, is God’s name; neither is any creature so called; and it is as much to say as, One that is of himself, and dependeth of nothing. Moreover, as oft as thou seest LORD in great letters (except there be any error in the printing), it is in Hebrew Iehouah, Thou that art; or, He that is.”[37] The name is also found in a 1651 edition of Ramón Martí’s Pugio fidei.[38]

The spelling used by Tyndale was “Iehouah”; at that time, “I” was not distinguished from J, and U was not distinguished from V

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jehovah#Vowel_points_of_%D7%99%D6%B0%D7%94%D6%B9%D7%95%D6%B8%D7%94_and_%D7%90%D6%B2%D7%93%D6%B9%D7%A0%D6%B8%D7%99

Iahoueh became Iehouah due to the ubiquitous ǎdônây, the Hebrew word for Lord (See below)

Let’s do the translation that should have belonged to William Tyndale.

1. Iah-oueh

2. Yah-oueh

oueh is translated to Hebrew as אוי pronounced “weh”

3. Yah-weh

May we all pause and honor William Tyndale. He would have been the first to translate and prove that the Name of the Most High Elohim is Yahweh. Let his name be mentioned alongside Michael S. Heisser.

Just the way it is.

May someone please tell William Tyndale in the resurrection. You are blessed and you did the right thing. You were tricked, but your method was perfect. You would have been the first person ever to translate Yahweh, the name of the Most High Elohim. But rejoice, a person who was taught the name Jehovah figured it out. Be at peace that your work was not in vain.

Yaweh says you are optimal, and that is that. Perhaps you know what that means.

Betrayal and death

Eventually, Tyndale was betrayed by Henry Phillips[31] to the imperial authorities,[32] seized in Antwerp in 1535, and held in the castle of Vilvoorde (Filford) near Brussels.[33] He was tried on a charge of heresy in 1536 and was condemned to be burned to death, despite Thomas Cromwell‘s intercession on his behalf. Tyndale “was strangled to death while tied at the stake, and then his dead body was burned”.[34] His final words, spoken “at the stake with a fervent zeal, and a loud voice”, were reported as “Lord! Open the King of England’s eyes.”[35][36] The traditional date of commemoration is 6 October, but records of Tyndale’s imprisonment suggest that the actual date of his execution might have been some weeks earlier.[37] Foxe gives 6 October as the date of commemoration (left-hand date column), but gives no date of death (right-hand date column).[33] Biographer David Daniell states the date of death only as “one of the first days of October 1536”.[36]

Within four years, four English translations of the Bible were published in England at the King’s behest,[b] including Henry’s official Great Bible. All were based on Tyndale’s work.[3

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tyndale

My work is dedicated to William Tyndale – The first person to translate Yahoueh יאֲהוֹוּאֵה

With love,
Tiffany McTaggart

Adonai (ǎdônây in Hebrew)

Yahoueh > Yah’-oueh > Yah’-weh

Letters from adonay substituted in:

Yehouah > Ye-ho’-wah > Je-ho’-vah

Confirmed by Encylopedia Britannica

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica/Jehovah

Here’s what must be accounted for by Michael S. Heisser

1. The form itself must be the imperfect conjugation, since the “y” of the first syllable is prefixed to the verb root (hyh/hwh).

2. The first syllable must have an a-class vowel (“yah”) to account for the abbreviated form of the name noted above.

3. The second syllable must be an i-class vowel because of the verb root (lemma). The ancient Semitic root hwy also requires an i-class vowel in the second syllable.

There is only one morphological verb formation (parsing) that makes sense of these elements: Hiphil stem, third person, singular, imperfect conjugation, from hyh/hwh. This form is vocalized yahyeh / yahweh and would mean “he who causes to be” (the Hiphil is a causative stem in Hebrew).

ǎdônây (Hebrew for Lord) parchment fragments are a dime a dozen. Don’t waste your time, unless of course you’re an adonay enthusiast. But if you are searching for the name of the true Elohim, it is Yahweh.

The table below shows the vowel points of Yehovah and Adonay, indicating the simple sheva in Yehovah in contrast to the hataf patah in Adonay. As indicated to the right, the vowel points used when YHWH is intended to be pronounced as Adonai are slightly different to those used in Adonai itself.

Hebrew (Strong’s #3068)/Meshikhi.org
YEHOVAH/YAHWEH
יְהֹוָה
Hebrew (Strong’s #136)
ADONAY
אֲדֹנָי
י Yod Y -Y א Aleph glottal stop
ְ Simple sheva E ֲ Hataf patah A
ה He H ד Dalet D
ֹ Holam O -A ֹ Holam O
ו Vav V -W נ Nun N
ָ Qamats A -E ָ Qamats A
ה He H -H י Yod Y

Yahweh

Y’hovah

(prounounced ĭ-hō’-vah because of the sh’va)

The Riddle of Adonai (Hebrew Adonay)

Adonay(Lord): title, spoken in place of Yahweh in Jewish display of reverence
https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/nas/adonay.html

Scholars are not in total agreement as to why יְהֹוָה‬ does not have precisely the same vowel points as adonai. The answer is simple. The purpose was not to match Iehouah perfectly, and as a matter of fact it had nothing to do with Yehovah, it was to “not pronounce” Yahweh because of their superstition about the Divine Name.

Enjoy!

With love,

Tiffany